Businessafrica.net Newsletter ISSN 1563-4108
Dr. QUENUM & ASSOCIATES
INVESTMENT AND BUSINESS PLANNERS
Tel: +1 440 941 5187
Click here for contact & support console


Click here to Purchase Africans, Stop Being Poor!
AFRICABIZ MONTHLY ISSUE - FRONTPAGE

Africabiz Online Home
Jobs Bidding
Current
Financing
Opportunities
Desktop Control
Add Links
Dynamic News
Developing News
MediaKit
FAQ
Contact-Support
Site Search by Freefind


Only US$12.75
Achetez Africains, Refusez de Rester Pauvres!


!

AFRICABIZ VOL 1 - ISSUE: 94
FEBRUARY 15 - MARCH 14, 2007
Previous Issue
Editor: Dr. Bienvenu-Magloire Quenum
Click here for contact & support console


Featured Article
Countries Briefs
Live News On Africa
Support Africabiz Online
Contact Information
Synopsis Rss Feed Sample
A Word From the Editor
Business Opportunities
FrontDoor
Your Feedback
Freebie For You
Control Your Desktop

A WORD FROM THE EDITOR


Dear visitor and international investor,


We warmly welcome you, if this is your first visit to Africabiz Online - The ultimate newsletter on trading and investing in 49 sub-Saharan African countries. If you are a regular and faithful reader, welcome back.

- BAD TIME MANAGEMENT: ANOTHER HANDICAP ON THE ROAD TO BUSINESS SUCCESS

In previous delivery, six reasons behind business failures in African countries had been outlined.

There is one more that had been left out, which is bad time-management. That is the non respect of meeting-schedule and timing. Most African entrepreneurs, traditional and modern alike fail to properly manage business- time.

They do wake up early to attend to the business, however time allocated to solving problems are not rationalized. They spend a lot of time on trivia and not enough on planning and customer research. They fall into the time trap.

Once the clientele established, they do not think ahead to expand the business. And the most killing behaviour is the non-respect of meeting-time and schedule.

In the early 1980's, I was involved in business planning with traditional merchants in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. With one of them in particular, the agreed meeting-time was set at every Monday to discuss and plan together about how to improve the business.

I was always present at his office at the agreed meeting-time that is 8:00 AM sharp. He will show up at 11:00 AM giving bogus excuse like unexpected visits at his home. Of course, he cannot understand when I charge the missing hours. I have to explain to him that he was not the only client, and that not showing up at agreed meeting-time has repercussion on my own schedule and program. I had to phone to delay or postpone another meeting.

Even nowadays, "modern" African entrepreneurs" do not respect meeting schedule or timing. And if they do, the meeting is not prepared to yielding positive results. Time is money had not yet been integrated by African business people. For more on the matter, click following link to read about: "Rules for Running a Meeting."

- SERVICES AND PRODUCTS FROM Dr. QUENUM & ASSOCIATES / BUSINESSAFRICA (TM)

List of Products and Solutions to trading and investing in and out emerging nations - and particularly in sub-Saharan African nations - is here to review.

We draw your attention to Jobs & Projects' platform that assists first, project-owners to tender for the best experts to carry out projects at very competitive costs, and, second, job-seekers to publish for free Résumés/CV to attract project-owners attention.

The Pay-Per- Click advertisement platform is also the cheapest way to advertise for your business.

- Contributor's Guidelines are here to review. Your contribution on "How emerging nations and particularly African countries / entrepreneurs could bridge the developing gap" is welcome. You may visit Africabiz Online Interactive to comment about articles posted in Africabiz Online.

Many thanks for dropping by and see you here on March 15, 2007.

Dr. B.M. Quenum

Editor of AFRICABIZ

Contact Dr. Bienvenu-Magloire Quenum

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES IN AFRICA


- Several business opportunities - component parts of the Integrated Developing Scheme described in Africans, Stop Being Poor! are listed in following table.


a- SHEA BUTTER (5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13)
b- BLUE GOLD (14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19)
c- FREEZE-DRIED PAPAIN (20, 21, 22 and here)
d- KENAF (23, 24)
e- VEGETABLE OIL (25, 26, 27, 28)
f- CEREALS (30, 31, 32, 33)
g- FRUITS (34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46)
h- ESSENTIAL OILS (47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52)
i- ROOTS & TUBERS (54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64)
j- FOWL BREEDING (66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76)
k- FISH FARMING (78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87)
l- BIOMASS ENERGY (89, 90, 91, 92)
m- SUGAR CANE & PRODUCTS (93, 94, 95,

- SUGAR CANE & PRODUCTS: PART II - SUGAR-CANE CULTIVATION: SMALL-SCALE GROWERS VERSUS HUGE AGRIBUSINESS CONCERNS

The first issue pertaining to current series outlined the importance of sugar-cane as Economic Catalyst to developing. This current delivery quickly gives the specifics of sugar-cane's cultivation prior to the issues that will address the transformation of the crop into added valued productions.

Sugarcane is a perennial plant, which cultivation requires a tropical or subtropical climate, with a minimum of 600 mm (24 in) of annual rainfall or irrigation moisture. It is one of the most efficient plant that needs a very small amount of sun rays to convert into biomass. Indeed, it can use only up to 2 percent of incident solar energy to perform the photosynthesis process. In prime growing regions, sugarcane can produce 20 kg for each square meter exposed to the sun.

Sugarcane is propagated from cuttings, rather than from seeds; although certain types still produce seeds, modern methods of stem cuttings have become the most common method of reproduction. Each cutting must contain at least one bud, and the cuttings are usually planted by hand. Once planted, a stand of cane can be harvested several times; after each harvest, the cane sends up new stalks, called ratoons. Usually, each successive harvest gives a smaller yield, and eventually the declining yields justify replanting.

Depending on agricultural practice, two to ten harvests may be possible between plantings.
Based on Mauritius vast experience in the field, a cycle of 7 harvests between plantations is the best to keep production-yields in the upper level in African production areas.

The most important sugarcane pests are the larvae of some lepidoptera species, including turnip moth, the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis and the Mexican rice borer (Eoreuma loftini), leaf-cutting ants, termites, spittlebugs (especially Mahanarva fimbriolata and Deois flavopicta) and the beetle Migdolus fryanus, among others.

Sugarcane is harvested by hand or mechanically. Hand harvesting accounts for more than half of the world's production, and is especially dominant in the developing world. When harvested by hand, the field is first set on fire. The fire spreads rapidly, burning away dry dead leaves, and killing any venomous snakes hiding in the crop, but leaving the water-rich stalks and roots unharmed. With knives (usually Cane Knives, but Machetes are also commonly used), harvesters then cut the standing cane just above the ground. A skilled harvester can cut 500 kg of sugarcane in an hour. [Source]

- SMALL-SCALE GROWERS OR BIG AGRIBUSINESS ESTATES?

Most of the times sugar-cane cultivation in African countries is performed on 100 to 5,000 hectares plantations integrated with central "big" capacity sugar refining plants, which require huge capital input in land purchasing / renting and preparation, harvesting equipment and transport vehicles. These big agribusiness concerns need seasonal workers to cope with the harvest.

Another possibility is the cultivation of sugar-cane by small-scale growers who tend to 1, 2 up to 10 hectares of plantations. That is the option we would be favoring in the forthcoming deliveries as such a production scheme would give jobs to thousands of farmers and transformers.

Such a production scheme that would be a component part of an African country's national Integrated Scheme would boost economic activities in rural areas in comparison to a scheme based on big agribusiness estates - option that had been opted for by most African countries. These small farmers and transformers products would range from sugar-cane fresh juice, brown-sugar (muscovado) , molasses, electricity and ethanol.

A forthcoming delivery of the current series will further describe such a scheme to highlight the benefits of producing brown cane-sugar through a network of sugar-cane small-growers and industrialists - versus the production of refined cane-sugar by huge agribusiness plantations and big sugar refining plants.

Prior to that forthcoming delivery, Mauritius sugar-cane industry gives an idea about the potential of the small-growers' option versus big agribusiness one. In Mauritius the small-scale growers number 28,000 farmers who account for about 30 percent of the country total production of sugar - that is they provide raw materials to produce, year in year out, 167,746 metric tons of sugar [based on an average production of refined sugar totaling 559,154 metric tons for the past 5 years.] The total cultivation area tend by these small-scale growers is equal to 12,000 hectares.

That means most of African countries could easily produce enough sugar to cater for national markets through a network of small-scale growers and transformers, create thousands of jobs (growers and transformers) and boost economic activities in rural areas.

- CANE-SUGAR SUPERVISING COMMITTEE - CSSC

For such a scheme - based on the cultivation of sugar-cane by small-scale growers (up to 10 hectares each) and the processing of the raw-material by small-scale transformers who would be producing brown-sugar (muscovado,) molasses and ethanol) - to be a successful venture, it would be necessary to setup a Cane-Sugar Supervising Committee - CSSC to provide logistics support that reads as follows:

- Assistance to cultivation: mechanization of all practices, including cane harvesting, irrigation and land preparation.
- Supply of high yielding sugar-cane varieties through research centers.
- Supply of fertilizer, herbicide and necessary inputs to the growers.
- Assistance to the transformers (production planning, equipment selection, production quality standardization. Etc.)
- A central marketing board. Etc.


MORE ON SUGAR CANE & PRODUCTS
1- Sugar Cane Industry, The (Cambridge Studies in Historical Geography)
by J.H. Galloway (Paperback Sep 23, 2005)
2- The House Surrounded by Sugar
by Leanna Williams (Paperback - Mar 8, 2006)
3- From Cane to Sugar (Start to Finish)
by Jill Braithwaite (Hardcover - Aug 2004)
4- Cane Sugar Handbook: A Manual for Cane Sugar Manufacturers and Their Chemists
by James C. P. Chen and Chung Chi Chou (Hardcover - Nov 8, 1993)
5-
Sugar Cane
by Alex Morgan (Paperback - Aug 28, 2002)
6- The Sugar cane factory: A catechism of cane sugar manufacture for the use of beginners
by Frederic I Scard (Unknown Binding - 1913)
7-
Sugar Cane Cultivation and Management
by Henk, Bakker and H., Bakker (Hardcover - Jan 1, 1999)
 

8- Sugar Cane (Tropical Agriculturalist)
by R. Fauconnier (Paperback - Feb 24, 1993)
9- Management Accounting for the Sugar Cane Industry (Sugar Sciences, Vol 8)
by A. E. Fok Kam (Hardcover - Mar 1988)
10- The nature and properties of the sugar cane
With practical directions for the improvement of its cultures, and the manufacture of its products)
by George Richardson Porter (Unknown Binding - 1831)
11- Sugar-cane and Sugar Industry in Nigeria
The Bitter Sweet Lessons
by Abdul-latif D. Busari (Paperback - Nov 2005)
12- The 2007-2012 World Outlook for Sugar Cane Mill Products
by Philip M. Parker (Paperback - Oct 13, 2006)

Adobe Acrobat Reader is available here
Locations of visitors to this page

- Interested parties - private African and international investors / companies, government agencies, international development agencies - to make contact through the Free Access Support Console available at this link

Contact through the support console will get quickest reply from Africabiz Online's staff, than contact by emails. Click here for contact information. Be advised that first contact should be through the support console to be followed by phone calls. If you are a VIP-Member, use VIP-Members Support Console available here.
Before you consult please click here to review this clarification

CLICK HERE TO BID ON JOBS AND PROJECTS
CLICK HERE TO ORDER AD INSERTION IN AFRICABIZ ONLINE PAGES

COUNTRIES BRIEFS

SEARCHING FOR SUCCESS IN HOME BUSINESS?
YOU NEED A COMPUTER & THE RIGHT KNOWLEDGE & TIPS

Click Here to Download Free eBooks for Successful Home Business